Bryan Fuller’s Star Trek Adds First Female Writer with Voyager Novelist

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Fantastic news to report on the Star Trek television front. Bryan Fuller’s writers room has just gained a woman with lots of experiencing writing about starships.

I’d been saying for months now the Star Trek writers room needed to get some diversity stat. We previously learned that on top of Fuller, Nicholas Meyer and Eugene “Rod” Roddenberry would be writing for the show which is great, but a lot of one type of perspective for a show that should be quite progressive both on screen and off. While it still behooves them to hire POCs for their writer’s room, this new report is a positive move.

TrekCore.com broke the news reporting:

Kirsten Beyer, who has been crafting the Star Trek: Voyager relaunch novel series since 2009, confirmed to TrekCore that she will be joining Bryan Fuller and the rest of the writing staff for the 2017 Star Trek series coming to CBS All Access.

Beyer has written eight full-length novels covering the ongoing adventures of the USS Voyager crew after the return from the Delta Quadrant, a role she took over from novelist Kristie Golden, who left the Voyager book series in 2004.

The author has been praised for her knack with tying disparate bits of Trek continuity together in her novels, tying relatively obscure or one-time events from the Voyager television episodes into her writing, and may bring a similar skill set to the Trek 2017 writers room.

We recently got our first teaser trailer for the CBS All Access series which, upon closer inspection, included a lot more than we previously thought.

Make sure to check out TrekCore as they’ve done some interviews with Beyer in the past.

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11 Responses to “Bryan Fuller’s Star Trek Adds First Female Writer with Voyager Novelist”

  1. Anyone read the books? I’m not much of a Trekkie, but I read a few of the ones that “Shatner wrote” and I absolutely loved the little bits of lore it played with and called back to.

  2. OH YEAH (DIG IT)! says:

    GREAT news!

  3. Rick Bman says:

    Has anyone read any of her novels and have any recommendations? I looked some up but they appear to be part of an on going series and I wouldn’t know where to jump in.

  4. teenygozer says:

    Fully one-half of the writer’s room should be female. Also, not sure why Eugene Roddenberry’s inclusion is considered a great thing! In what way is this not considered nepotism, which, last I looked, was a BAD thing (unless the person hired has proven his or her talent.) I’ve checked IMDB and it doesn’t seem like Rod Jr. has done all that much in the way of awesome work. Can we assume he wouldn’t have gotten this job except that he was Roddenberry’s son? Did Gene Coon have a kid? If yes, could we get him or her in there, too, as Coon had as much to do with Star Trek’s awesomeness as Roddenberry.

    • OH YEAH (DIG IT)! says:

      I don’t know. Joe Hill does great work, and so does the Henson family. Nepotism doesn’t seem like a terrible thing in this medium.

      • teenygozer says:

        Nepotism is a good and terrible thing in turns in show biz just as it is in any other business or medium. I used to watch a great show called The Dead Zone, just genius. Great plots, amazing dialogue, characters you cared about. Tight and logical plotting, never an Idiot Plot to be seen. It was developed for television and show-run by Michael Piller (who had a long history of great shows behind him) and Shawn Piller, his son.

        Then Michael Piller died suddenly of a heart attack and the show was delivered into the hands of the son only. It became evident that Shawn had been following daddy’s lead for the first couple of seasons but hadn’t learned a thing at his father’s knee. The plots were became sloppy, usually motivated by someone doing something out of character or stupid. Dialogue dropped into un-memorability, people just kind of yammered at one another. There were bad cuts to other scenes when the dialogue got too involved. There was an uptick in attractive sex-workers as the focus of plots, or dead bodies lying about.

        I highly recommend the show, but just the first couple of seasons. Instead of bringing in a professional showrunner, nepotism did that show in.

    • I have terrible news.

      Most places you work, you’re going to be dealing with that.

      • teenygozer says:

        I’m in the 55 to 65 year age bracket, kiddo, I figured that one out along the way. But it won’t change if we don’t state that it’s wrong, wrong, wrong as often as we can.

  5. teenygozer says:

    Fully one-half of the writer’s room should be female. Also, not sure why Eugene Roddenberry’s inclusion is considered a great thing! In what way is this not considered nepotism, which, last I looked, was a BAD thing (unless the person hired has proven his or her talent.) I’ve checked IMDB and it doesn’t seem like Rod Jr. has done all that much in the way of awesome work. Can we assume he wouldn’t have gotten this job except that he was Roddenberry’s son? Did Gene Coon have a kid? If yes, could we get him or her in there, too, as Coon had as much to do with Star Trek’s awesomeness as Roddenberry.

  6. Doodlee Pigvirus says:

    if they could finally achieve a gender-balanced cast, i’d be truly happy. don’t even know how you can call it the future without one.